230 33rd St, Newport News, VA 23607
 The next window depicts the visit which Mary, expecting her child, paid to her cousin Elizabeth (Lk. 1:1-20). The medallion at the top of the window depicts an incense burner with smoke arising from it. Incense is a symbol of royalty, before whom it was burnt as a sign of respect and reverence. For that reason, it was included among the gifts the Magi brought to the Christ Child.  The main section of the window shows Mary, dressed in blue, but with embroidery different from the Annunciation window. The toe of a red shoe peeks out from the hem of the garment, duplicating the effect of the red cushion in the former window and, with the color of the sky to the upper left, again displaying the three primary colors. The moment captured is when she and her cousin first meet. She is clasping the proffered hand of Elizabeth who, dressed in a lovely black and tan robe, kneels before Mary in the attitude expressed by her words: “Blessed are you among women and blessed is the fruit of your womb. And why is this granted me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?” (Lk. 1:42-43) As Elizabeth is pregnant with John the Baptist, it also shows John’s subordination to the Messiah whose coming he will announce. Elizabeth is clearly well-advanced in age, as is her husband Zechariah, shown just exiting the door to greet Mary, wearing a purple garment (Advent colors), his hand raised in a gesture which is at once a greeting and a blessing, fitting since he is a priest. (The story of this elderly couple’s miraculous, though human, conception of John is told in Lk. 1:5-25).  The treatment of the evening sky seen behind stylized trees and buildings is especially beautiful here. The earth on which Elizabeth kneels is unusually dark, perhaps because it is supposed to be late in the day, and is broken by only a few plants. Below the main composition, is a Rose of Sharon, another flower used to symbolize the Virgin as a glory of Israel. At the center of the flower is the letter “M”, the first initial of she whose “…soul magnifies the Lord….” (Lk.l:46).

The Visitation

 The next window depicts the visit which Mary, expecting her child, paid to her cousin Elizabeth (Lk. 1:1-20). The medallion at the top of the window depicts an incense burner with smoke arising from it. Incense is a symbol of royalty, before whom it was burnt as a sign of respect and reverence. For that reason, it was included among the gifts the Magi brought to the Christ Child.  The main section of the window shows Mary, dressed in blue, but with embroidery different from the Annunciation window. The toe of a red shoe peeks out from the hem of the garment, duplicating the effect of the red cushion in the former window and, with the color of the sky to the upper left, again displaying the three primary colors. The moment captured is when she and her cousin first meet. She is clasping the proffered hand of Elizabeth who, dressed in a lovely black and tan robe, kneels before Mary in the attitude expressed by her words: “Blessed are you among women and blessed is the fruit of your womb. And why is this granted me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?” (Lk. 1:42-43) As Elizabeth is pregnant with John the Baptist, it also shows John’s subordination to the Messiah whose coming he will announce. Elizabeth is clearly well-advanced in age, as is her husband Zechariah, shown just exiting the door to greet Mary, wearing a purple garment (Advent colors), his hand raised in a gesture which is at once a greeting and a blessing, fitting since he is a priest. (The story of this elderly couple’s miraculous, though human, conception of John is told in Lk. 1:5-25).  The treatment of the evening sky seen behind stylized trees and buildings is especially beautiful here. The earth on which Elizabeth kneels is unusually dark, perhaps because it is supposed to be late in the day, and is broken by only a few plants. Below the main composition, is a Rose of Sharon, another flower used to symbolize the Virgin as a glory of Israel. At the center of the flower is the letter “M”, the first initial of she whose “…soul magnifies the Lord….” (Lk.l:46).

The next window depicts the visit which Mary, expecting her child, paid to her cousin Elizabeth (Lk. 1:1-20). The medallion at the top of the window depicts an incense burner with smoke arising from it. Incense is a symbol of royalty, before whom it was burnt as a sign of respect and reverence. For that reason, it was included among the gifts the Magi brought to the Christ Child.

The main section of the window shows Mary, dressed in blue, but with embroidery different from the Annunciation window. The toe of a red shoe peeks out from the hem of the garment, duplicating the effect of the red cushion in the former window and, with the color of the sky to the upper left, again displaying the three primary colors. The moment captured is when she and her cousin first meet. She is clasping the proffered hand of Elizabeth who, dressed in a lovely black and tan robe, kneels before Mary in the attitude expressed by her words: “Blessed are you among women and blessed is the fruit of your womb. And why is this granted me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?” (Lk. 1:42-43) As Elizabeth is pregnant with John the Baptist, it also shows John’s subordination to the Messiah whose coming he will announce. Elizabeth is clearly well-advanced in age, as is her husband Zechariah, shown just exiting the door to greet Mary, wearing a purple garment (Advent colors), his hand raised in a gesture which is at once a greeting and a blessing, fitting since he is a priest. (The story of this elderly couple’s miraculous, though human, conception of John is told in Lk. 1:5-25).

The treatment of the evening sky seen behind stylized trees and buildings is especially beautiful here. The earth on which Elizabeth kneels is unusually dark, perhaps because it is supposed to be late in the day, and is broken by only a few plants. Below the main composition, is a Rose of Sharon, another flower used to symbolize the Virgin as a glory of Israel. At the center of the flower is the letter “M”, the first initial of she whose “…soul magnifies the Lord….” (Lk.l:46).